OFFICEHOLDER RESIDENCY



Because of the recent radical propositions concerning open borders and limitless immigration, amnesties, abolishing immigration and border defense departments and encouraging mass migrations to our border we hereby suggest these just and reactionary parameters to better acclimate potential officeholders who are naturalized citizens to our culture, traditions and civic systems. The Constitution limits only the presidency to natural born citizens and while we bolster durations for the other offices we adequately keep them open as some of the most dedicated citizens for limited government can be first generation immigrants. These adjustments also make better representation for all citizens by giving office to those who have inhabited their constituency an adequate amount of time.



Here for convention, we regard all citizens and/or 'legal residents' to have legally resided for some duration in their relevant jurisdiction as records indicate.



Accordingly....


• No person shall be a representative of the U.S. House who shall not have legally resided within the boundaries of their district back 5 years before their election and likewise 8 years within that district's state and 12 years within the United States proper. These times will overlap with the citizenship duration required in the Constitution.

• For all seats in the House two full terms must have passed that were served out only by natural born citizens before a naturalized citizen can hold the seat.



• No person shall be a senator in the U.S. Senate who shall not have legally resided within the boundaries of their associated state back 15 years before their election or appointment and likewise 20 years within the United States proper. These times will overlap with the citizenship duration required in the Constitution.

• For all seats in the Senate three full terms must have passed that were served out only by natural born citizens before a naturalized citizen can hold the seat.

• Only one senator at a time for a state in the U.S. Senate may be a naturalized citizen.



• No person shall be a supreme court justice who shall not have attained the age of 35 years and not have legally resided within the U.S. proper back 25 years before their nomination and likewise been a citizen of the U.S. 20 years. These required durations will all overlap.

• No more than a quarter of the Supreme Court justices can be naturalized citizens.




We construe the existing prerequisite citizenship/residency requirements in the Constitution (Article I: Section 2. ¶2, Section 3. ¶3; Article II: Section 1. ¶5) for representatives, senators and presidents to stretch back from the start of their terms and that re-naturalization of a presidential contender technically counts them out as not a naturally born citizen and thus no longer a presidential contender unless further amendment states otherwise and sets up parameters. Other branches' discontinuities in residency and citizenship may be directed to be taken up by congressional legislation with limits on durations and circumstances.


Now combining all that with the new rules we have proposed further above we can in conclusion make that all representatives, senators, presidents and supreme justices must have been legal residents / citizens of the U.S. for allotted lengths of time when respectively nominated, primaried, elected, starting out terms and likewise of a particular state or district when relevant to that office.